• New Development: The Spiral

    The construction of a new skyscraper, The Spiral, has commenced. As part of the gigantic development Hudson Yards, the twisty high-rise is developed based on the planes of architect Bjarke Ingels. It will span the entire New York block bounded by 10th Ave., Hudson Blvd, 34th St., and 35th St. As part of the atypical design, the glass facade will be punctuated by a series of vertical gardens, which will wrap around the 1,031 feet tall building. To fully experience this symbiosis of architecture and nature, we have to await the completion of the tower in 2022.

  • Designer Thomas Heatherwick Puts His Stamp on Chelsea's Skyline

    The design principal domineering most of New York's new real estate developments seem to be mirrored and seamless glass fronts. Naturally, the recently unveiled plans for the construction of two residential towers in Chelsea (Manhattan) drew particular attention. Their unusual look is mainly driven by the barrel-shaped windows, which reference the gridded exteriors of warehouses in the area. The building pair by British designer Thomas Heatherwick will flank the popular High Line Park and fascinate with stunning Hudson River views.

  • Open House New York

    Open House New York, the architecture lovers' favorite holiday, returns with an extra day this year. During the unique event, visitors can take a peek at many NY institutions normally not open to the public. Hundreds of NYC's architectural sites and cultural venues will open their doors from October 12–14 all over the city. Next to a few classics like the Brooklyn Army Terminal and the Woolworth Building, several newcomers like the 3 World Trade Center and landmarked Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn have been added to the docket. Some sites require reservations, so check out the website to plan your personal Open House weekend: ohny.org/weekend

     

  • Central Park Sculpture

    British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE brings Wind Sculpture (SG) I to the Central Parks southeastern entrance at 60th St. & 5th Ave. The 23-foot-tall piece that’s been hand-painted in colors inspired by the beaches of Lagos takes on the paradoxical task of manifesting the invisible. We can’t see wind, but we do see its effects, like in a piece of fabric, mimicked by the artwork. The sculpture will stick around until Oct 2018.

  • Smoked Watermelon Ham

    Some visitors simply shake their head over the unusual food trends popping up all over New York. The newest, absurd creation is the Smoked Watermelon Ham. It's not the typical dish of melon with prosciutto but rather a watermelon cured and smoked like a ham in a time-intensive process. Duck’s Eatery, the birthplace of this meat-fruit, can only serve two Smoked Watermelon Hams per night. Regardless of the high price tag of $75 its already sold out until November. Apparently, it's delicious!

  • The EL–New York's elevated train from 1878

    Public transportation has always been a tricky topic in New York, now just as much as 150 years ago. Unknown to many of today's visitors is the mass transit solution the city discovered back then, an elevated train soon called the “EL.” Unlike the above ground Subways today, which can mostly be found in Queens and Brooklyn, the original EL used to run along 3rd Avenue, from South Ferry to Grand Central. The first segment opened in 1878 and service was phased out in 1955. The Third Avenue EL was the last elevated line to operate in Manhattan and a frequent backdrop for movies. Those were the days!

  • Outdoor Movie Festival

    New York visitors should not be spending these warm summer days in dark movie theaters. The solution? Outdoor cinema with Rooftop Films. This festival presents an exciting mix of indies, docs, and shorts at changing locations. That means not just secluded parks and rooftops with stunning views but also exciting and unusual screening locations, such as cemeteries and industrial monuments. Roll it!

  • The Manhattan Bridge through centuries

    One of the most sought-after destinations in New York City is the iconic view of the Manhattan Bridge from Washington Street in DUMBO, Brooklyn. Featured in countless movie scenes and vacation photos the scenic image has been popular throughout centuries. Check out the bridge from its construction to the current date and share the timeless fascination.

  • Photographer's guide to New York City

    1.2 trillion photos are taken each year, many of them in New York City. Check out our photographer's guide to the city below to get most out of your vacation snaps or contact LOCALIKE New York, if you want to book a guided photo-safari through NYC.

    Exchange Place Waterfront, Jersey City
    The best pictures of Manhattan can be taken from across the river in either Brooklyn or New Jersey. The latter tends not to be overcrowded and its views—particularly of One World Trade Center (OWT)—are unparalleled.

    Lower Manhattan
    For a more unseen view of the OWT building, head over to the corner of Fulton & Nassau Sts where the stunning skyscraper lines up with the urban canyon for the perfect symbiosis of street life and architecture.

    Street Art 
    It's a bit of a trip but the mural series in Bushwick, Brooklyn is a fantastic destination. Start your hunt for the most colorful street art photo at St Nicholas Ave & Troutman St and let the murals guide you from there.

  • The Waffle Iron Building, 432 Park Avenue

    The start was bumpy–the design by architect Rafael Viñoly received a lot of criticism, and New Yorkers were not happy about the now second tallest building in their home city. Now two years after its completion the stunning structure with the dull name 432 Park Avenue has become NYC’s best-selling building ever with $2 billion in sales. And even the locals have made their peace with the new fixture in the Midtown skyline.

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