Tag Archives: like a local

  • Tips to get around NYC without your phone



    Thanks to the street grid system, finding your way around New York is actually pretty easy. That being said, there are always confusing situations: which way is south and which way is north? East? West? And where in Central Park am I, exactly? We’ve assembled six tips to help you navigate your way around the city like a local.

    1. Central Park is enormous and it’s easy to lose your orientation there. For this reason, the park’s lampposts serve as reference points. Most are marked with numbers that correspond to the crossroads, which are located at the same height on both sides of the park. If a lantern is marked with the number 7304, for example, you’re between 73rd & 74th Streets.

    2. Traffic in Manhattan usually only travels in one direction. On streets with odd numbers (i.e., 17th Street), the traffic travels west. On even-numbered streets, traffic travels east.

    3. Traffic on avenues (i.e. 5th Avenue) travels north and south, almost always in alternating directions (beginning with 1st Avenue, which is north-bound).

    4. There’s a trick that will help you remember the order of the avenues (e.g., Lexington Avenue) in Manhattan: “You can take a CAB back home if it’s Late PM.” Columbus, Amsterdam, and Broadway are on the west side of the city; Lexington, Park, and Madison Avenue are on the east side.

    5. 5th Avenue divides Manhattan’s east and west sides. On each side, the street numbering starts at 5th Avenue. 10 East 36th Street is east of 5th Avenue and is an altogether different address than 10 West 36th Street. The only exception is Broadway, which in some places runs diagonally through the city.

    6. In Manhattan, most of the northbound (or uptown-bound) subway lines can be accessed on the east side of a given street. The southbound (or downtown-bound) lines tend to be located on the west side of the street. Remembering this will save you from having to cross the street at the last minute before taking the subway.

    When all else fails, there is, of course, still Google Maps—or LOCALIKE New York. :)

  • The Mayor

    How many mayors are there in the world? We don’t know, and neither does Google. However, Google does know the name of every single mayor New York has ever had, and that surely means the “Mayor of New York City” is a very significant one. He or she leads an organization that has a budget of over 70 billion dollars and employs 330,000 people. That’s a lot more than in your average city. Until today there have been 109 NYC mayors. Let’s take a look at a couple of exceptional ones from recent times.

    Fiorello La Guardia
    La Guardia’s nickname, “Little Flower,” is derived from his Italian first name and refers to his height of only about 5’2” (1.57 m). His legacy as mayor, however, is one of the most impressive. He was in office from 1934 to 1945. During his term, he primarily concentrated on the reconstruction and maintenance of the then-dilapidated infrastructure. Parks, highways, an airport, and countless apartment buildings for social housing were built from the ground up. At the same time, he was highly successful in fighting the then-notorious corruption and organized crime. His name and accomplishments are remembered with an airport, a street in Manhattan, and a sculpture on that street.

    Ed Koch
    Ed Koch was mayor from 1978 to 1989. His accomplishments were numerous. Like La Guardia, he was responsible for the construction of lots of housing for socially disadvantaged people. He was the first mayor to create laws against the discrimination of LGBTQ employees of the City of New York. However, he wasn’t always on the same wavelength as his citizens. For one, he was an ardent supporter of the death penalty, which repeatedly earned him violent criticism from New Yorkers. The eternal bachelor liked to ride the subway, and he’d often walk up to strangers on a crowded street corner and ask them how they were doing.

    Rudy Giuliani
    Giuliani was mayor of New York from 1994 to 2011. During his term, crime rates sunk at an unprecedented rate. New York City was suddenly one of the safest cities in the USA, which simultaneously made for a dramatic economic and touristic boom. Mayor Giuliani’s zero-tolerance politics, however, did not come without their price, and he certainly wasn’t loved by everyone. Some circles accused him of stifling the city’s spirit. All in all, however, even today most people seem to think he made the city more livable for everybody. In his last year of service, he had to act as a crisis manager in the largest catastrophe the city had ever seen—the attacks of September 11th.

    Michael Bloomberg
    After La Guardia and Giuliani, Michael Bloomberg was the third-ever Republican mayor in the history of the city to win the re-election. As in the case of his two predecessors, his views differed drastically from those of the mother party, especially on social issues. He was mayor from 2002 to 2013. During his time in office, he resigned from the Republican party and became an independent. As one of the richest men in the world, he renounced his salary and worked for a symbolic $1 per year. His time in office was characterized by economic upswing and great progress in quality of life. He has left a visible legacy in the city’s new car-free zones, bike paths, the bike-sharing program Citibike, and many other projects. However, he was often accused of being too closely associated with wealthy circles—it’s not quite clear if all New York citizens profited equally from the economic upturn. Bloomberg also created a law that secured him a third term in office, which earned him lots of criticism.

  • The Really-Important Packing List for New York

    Optimal Weight
    At LOCALIKE, we generally maintain a very relaxed relationship to calories—after all, we only recommend restaurants that we’ve already tried out ourselves. Considering the city has a good 25,000 restaurants, you should plan to arrive hungry. The variety is difficult to believe. From delicious tacos for $3 to a feast in a world-class restaurant, there’s no cuisine in the world that isn’t represented here. Last year, 99 Michelin stars were awarded in New York. If, on your visit, you like the Big Apple so much that you decide to stay, you could eat at a different restaurant every day for 68 years.

    Scarf
    No matter which time of year you come to New York, it never hurts to bring a scarf along in your suitcase. Our limited knowledge of meteorology prevents an accurate explanation of why this happens, but a large collection of very high buildings seems to create the conditions for spontaneous gusts of wind, even on a mild spring day. And then there are the countless air conditioning systems that can make a room feel positively arctic.

    Dog Treats
    The fact that there are so many people in a limited amount of space in New York doesn’t mean there’s no room for loyal four-legged friends. On the contrary: about 600,000 dogs live in the city. Especially for singles, the “Oh, he’s sooo cute!” line could come in handy. By the way, there are also about a half-million cats in the city. But who has time to win over a cat on their vacation?

    Umbrella
    You’re better off leaving this at home. No umbrella survives for longer than 30 minutes in a real New York storm, and in case you end up in need, you’ll find one for very little money on any corner. No one quite understands how it is that all the umbrella merchants manage to show up within a few minutes of the rain beginning. But it’s very practical.



    Plastic
    This tip goes especially for our European friends: a credit card makes life in New York a thousand times easier.

    Sun Protection
    New York is at about the same latitude as Rome, so the risk of getting a sunburned nose begins as early as April. What’s more, New York has even more hours of sun than Rome does—a whopping 2,535 hours on 269 days, to be exact.

    Curiosity
    Bring along as much of this as you can. Nowhere else on earth has quite as much to discover.



    Charm
    This won’t hurt, either—especially not in New York.

    An Almost Empty Suitcase
    Since we’re on the subject of packing: sure, it’s good to be prepared for everything. At the same time, though, we’d recommend traveling as lightly as possible. In New York there’s no shortage of opportunities to fill up your suitcase for the way home. Some of you may catch the famous/infamous shopping fever; others will just need room to store all the experiences…