Tag Archives: skyline

  • Charming Mini Trips with New York Ferry

    Ferry service in NYC began in 1817 with trips between Staten Island and Manhattan. With 23.9 million passengers each year, the Staten Island Ferry it is the busiest ferry route in the United States and the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system. After 200 years, the city has introduced 6 additional ferry routes and expanded service to all five boroughs. This translates to 4 million more passengers on the East River each year. Though the public ferry can get crowded during the summer months, locals and visitors agree: It’s the most scenic (and sometimes fastest) way to get around and the best $2.75 you can spend while in NYC.

    The public NYC Ferry is very popular with New Yorkers commuting to/from work in waterfront Neighborhoods along the East River. Besides running efficiently and on-time, it offers on-board snacks or drinks, including Rosé on tap – a relaxing treat on a summer evening. Speaking of summer evenings…How does a gorgeous view of the Manhattan skyline or Brooklyn Bridge at sunset sound as a backdrop for your ferry ride? Most public ferries have an outdoor deck with spectacular, unobstructed views of your favorite iconic landmarks.
    LOCALIKE Tip: Want to enjoy a mini beach excursion? Take the Rockaway ferry from Lower Manhattan to Rockaway, Queens where you will find locals surfing, or frolicking in the sun and the Atlantic Ocean. For more info, visit: http://go.localike.com/toi

  • A Quick Round of Jenga in Midtown Manhattan

    Speaking about skyscrapers these days has become a race in superlatives. The huge buildings are constantly being ranked & compared in terms of their height, value, age or eco-efficiency. 270 Park Avenue, on first sight, might seem like a modest competitor in this arena. The skyscraper, which was completed in 1964, is by no means an insignificant dwarf. Its 52 floors are spread over a towering 705 ft (205 meters) in a Midcentury architectural style with a steel and glass façade. 270 Park Avenue’s claim to skyscraper superstardom is coming into fruition in an unexpected way. It will be the tallest building ever demolished when it is torn down later this year. It’s a rather strange record to set, but a new record nonetheless.

    The building, which is owned by J.P. Morgan Chase, serves as the bank's headquarters. Over the years, the tower has slowly become cramped, with 6,000 people occupying as space that was originally designed for 3,500. But thanks to a recent change in zoning laws in Midtown, Manhattan, the construction of much higher buildings than was previously permitted is now possible. This, of course has been music to J.P. Morgan Chase’s ears. The bank has chosen to keep its footprint and build a taller skyscraper after demolishing 270 Park Avenue.

    The architectural community and concerned citizens alike are criticizing the project to demolish 270 Park Avenue. Besides seeming like the building was injected into the present day from the Mad Men era, 270 Park Avenue is also the only building of this size that was planned by a woman: Architect Natalie De Blois. De Blois worked for the world-famous architecture firm "SOM" at the time it was built. The firm’s name has become ubiquitous when it comes to top projects throughout the city. Their most famous work is Mies van der Rohe's Lever House.

    The renowned architect Norman Foster has already signed on to build J.P. Morgan Chase’s new headquarters. The 70-storey high building will accommodate 15,000 employees. And just in case you're wondering how a building of this size will be demolished in the busy streets of Midtown, Manhattan, here’s a clue: Imagine taking apart a "Jenga" tower piece by piece from above. But hopefully nothing will topple over...

  • Hudson Yards: New York’s Newest Neighborhood



    A City in a City
    New York is a pulsating city in constant flux. Some things change subtly and invisibly; others take years to develop and alter the city irrevocably. An example of the latter is the megaproject Hudson Yards in Western Manhattan. Between 8th and 10th Avenues and 30th and 42nd St., that is, where Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, and Midtown West intersect, a new city district has emerged. It is the largest private construction project since Rockefeller Center was finished in 1939 and the largest in American history. By 2025, 15 skyscrapers will be built over a space of 395 acres (1,6 million m2). Once the construction is completed, the area, which encompasses 45 city blocks, will house 4,000 apartments. On top of that, 100 stores, a public school, a luxury hotel, several restaurants, and a center for modern art will also open their doors. Altogether over 125,000 people will live and work in the skyscrapers.

    How is a project like this possible in a city as densely populated as New York? The Hudson Yards are in a post-industrial section of Manhattan that was long neglected and unattractive. The Long Island Railroad parks its commuter trains here, and there’s also a railway tunnel to New Jersey. Because both the train station and the tunnel must remain in operation, the neighborhood will be built on top of the train tracks thanks to a 10-acre (four-hectare) platform. The construction will be supported by 300 pillars drilled 79 ft (24 m) deep into massive rock. When the Hudson Yards are completed, a mountain of new skyscrapers will leave Manhattan’s skyline forever changed. The project has been the talk of the town for years. There are three particular topics on peoples’ minds: 

    30 Hudson Yards
    When it is completed, the skyscraper 30 Hudson Yards will be the tallest building in the new district and the second-tallest in New York. At a towering 1296 ft (395 m), it will surpass the Empire State Building by 46 ft (14 m). Among the highlights is the highest outdoor viewing platform in the city. The building is scheduled to open in 2019.



    The Vessel
    A public park stretching across five acres (20’000 m2) will be home to 28,000 plants and 200 different tree species. In the middle of the garden, a sculpture called “The Vessel” will act as the heart of the new city district. The main component of the accessible structure, which is reminiscent of a beehive, is 154 interlocking stairways consisting of a total of 2,500 steps. While the diameter of the building is about 50 ft (15 m) on the ground, up on the 15th floor it’s a whopping 148 ft (45 m). The steps of the walk-in sculpture lead to 80 balconies, all of which serve as viewing platforms. The monument was developed by the British star architect, artist, and designer Thomas Heatherwick.



    The Shed
    The Shed will be New York’s most up-and-coming cultural center. The six-floor building was designed by the award-winning architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro. It’s already clear that the building will be an architectural highlight when it opens. One section of the building can be extended and drawn back in to adapt to cultural events of all kinds. In summer, there’s enough room for large outdoor events, and in the colder months the indoor halls can be used for concerts or other large events. The Shed will host music, art exhibitions, installations, dance performances, etc., and thereby become a new cultural hot spot in New York. New York Fashion Week is already in conversation with the building and plans to move in after the latter opens in 2019.



    This gigantic project will allow for an enriching new attraction in New York City.